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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
believe, that we are one family in this great country of ours. we are black and white, we are brown, we are republicans and democrats. we are conservatives and liberals. we are gays and straights. we are from every part of this great country of ours, every region, small town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nations of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio secretary. >> i moved jon husted be designated as the ex-officio secretary of the 53rd electoral college. >> moving that mr. husted be designated. all those in favor by saying aye. opposed? ayes have it. mr. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we electors are about to cast our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set for
:00 eastern time. listen in the baltimore area. for online c-span.org. >> brown university held the discussion about polls were saying before and after the 2012 presidential election. the associate research director explained. he also talked about the future of presidential polling. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, everyone i and the professor of public policy and director here at brown university. i am happy to welcome you to another installment of the speaker series. the luncheon speaker series is one of the of any event. it attempts to inform brown and a larger community about important matters related to government, politics, and public policy. over the years the speaker series has been a wonderful opportunity for the undergraduate students and masters did it a public policy to connect with of foreign- policy thinkers. we're just pleased this afternoon to welcome the associate director for research of the ku research center. michael has co-authored a number of the pure research center landmark thoughts including in- that of political -- political and social values. next month michael wi
to have an electric car or natural gas-powered car and you see what happens. senator brown alexander has been a real leader in this and he even has an electric car. he is going the distance here, walking the walk. that's the kind of thing government can do. government can do a lot on the regulatory side to slow things down if you forget to have effective cost-benefit analysis, but it can do a lot on the project side to really find something that works and the community becomes the laboratory for change and that others can then model. you do not have to do it everywhere and if you can show in water to a location that there really work. that is the driving force behind the idea of that lamar has been a significant spokesperson for. >> do like that car? >> i do like it. i have driven my leaf. for a lit -- for a year-and-a- half. i live in this building in a plug in the wall when i go home at night. that's all i have to do. deployment communities are a good idea. sometimes the government can have a demonstration project that makes a difference. they did a hydraulic factory and we have had fr
and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of thing. the idea of actually depicting presidents t idea of doing that is you can't take it seriously, that kind of thing. so the idea that peter morgan who is a well respected writer but hadn't found his voice up to that point. it wasn't until he wrote "the deal" he found his groove. having him on board and having proper producers behind it gave it a seriousness and a weight that nothing had had before that was looking at these sort of people. so "the deal" was on tv. i was offered the part and no one knew what to expect. everyone expected it to fail and not work. and i think through a combination of factors, the tone was right and it was acceptable and suddenly once the tone was acceptable and people were tible accept watching a drama which includes tony blair in bed. snons you take that seriously it opens an entire new unive
pounds of thermal protection. it would last forever. it just turns brown and does not char. >> thank you for being such a rock star engineer. i really look up to that. you have spoken this whole evening about inspiration and the fact that everyone that you look up to was inspired at some time. i wonder if you have your own branch whose sole purpose is to inspire youth? >> you know, i am very familiar. i was judged at the first u.s. first competition. i was invited to be a judge and the competition was just too high schools in manchester the first year. so i am very familiar and supportive of that. i gave a talk at a brand new charter school in my home town where they are starting off kids with robotics between the ages of 6 and 13. boy, are they excited to go to school. let's see. the big problem that we had that we never could even do a student summer co-op program -- the problem is, our company was so small that it was hard for us to build barriers from one project to another. everyone of them essentially is nonpublic. richard branson's program, he tells everyone about it. in almost ev
to the corridor and the connections that we have. a question was raced by ms. brown about impeding some of the service along the way. actually if it's properly done and there is separation, we can enhance local passenger service commuter service and we can also increase freight traffic by again separation within the corridor with the right plan. so i look forward to working with you mr. boardman, with the deputy administrator and others. and thank you for participating today. we're going to leave the record open till the 31st of december. how is that for a date, without objection. and we'll have additional questions we'll submit to you. may i yield to ms. norton. >> that's a fine date. we'll either be over the cliff or not by that time. i appreciate this hearing. i want to say i have an a supporter of private projects in my own subcommittee on economic development where it's better known and better understood and extensively used. i have -- and therefore, i'm very interested in its conceivable application to a railroad. if we did more public private partnerships in construction and real
and worked at a plant that made industrial magnets. he later attended brown university which is something we have in common and played rugby well according to some of my rugby-playing friends and met his wife there. he is a lawyer by trade with a law degree from notre dame and started out in the general counsel's office in 1993 which then merged with bank of america in 2004 and was eventually elevated to general council in 2008. when bank of america bought merrill lynch as it was teetering on the edge of the financial crisis he was named c.e.o. of the investment firm then c.e.o. of the bank. so brian became c.e.o. at a time we all agree was a tumultuous time in the banking industry. under his leadership the bank has focused on reducing non- core business assets as well as its mortgage surfacing portfolio. "fortune" magazine wrote of brian reveals that he has proven his mettle as team builder and crisis manager and perhaps uniquely suited for the job of chief executive in the banking world. the business is now so complicated and so fraught with hidden dangers lodged in esso take that leaders
walker will welcome you as well. ed reilly will give the polling results, and ron brown will do the interview and then we will have a panel discussion. it will be a terrific day. please turn these babies off. again, welcome. joan walker is executive vice president of allstate. joan has been a terrific partner with us over the last four years. she is responsible for all relations for allstate. prior to joining that company, she did similar work with monsanto. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what this town of washington is all about. that you very much, and welcome our friends here. [applause] >> ok, good morning, and thank you so much for that kind introduction. "the atlantic" and "national journal" have been terrific partners in this effort. i thank them very much for that, and many thanks to edward reilly, who will take us through the data today, and also for jeremy, an associate, who was the lead researcher on the poll. we have interviewed 25,000 americans. we have a very rich body of knowledge about specific issues, and now coming togethe
.o.p. members besides scott brown who have come forward to support any kind of gun control? >> not at this time. but i haven't had the opportunity to talk with any of them yet. >> you mentioned president clinton called you. i'm wondering if you can elaborate more on what he said and what if anything you've asked him to do in this process? >> he was talking about the battle back in 1993 with the bill that interestingingly enough was introduced and passed in 1993 and went into effect in 1994. of course he was president and the white house came alive and was very, very helpful in enabling the passage soft that bill bath in the senate and in the house. and so to have him part of the team again is really quite special for us. >> [inaudible] >> there is not unanimous consent agreement. i talked with my vice chairman this morning. i don't know what is hled holding it up but the general belief is this bill will be on the floor next week when we come back. >> when you talked about the state of the art repenry out there. your bill doesn't call for any confiscation of weapons out there. other than stoppin
are calling for action. >> can you name any g.o.p members beside scott brown, who have come forward to support any kind of gun control? >> not at this time, but i have not had the opportunity to talk with them yet, either. >> president clinton called you. i wonder if you can elaborate a little bit more on what he said and what you have asked him to do. >> he was talking about back in 1993 with the bill. interestingly enough it was introduced and passed within the year of 1993. it went into effect in 1994. he was president. the white house came alive. he was a very, very helpful and enabling the passage of that bill in the senate and the house. to have him part of the team again is really quite special for us. >> an agreement on that? >> there is not yet unanimous agreement. i talked with my vice chairman this morning. i do not know what is holding it up. the general belief is that this bill will be on the floor next week we come back. >> when you talked about the state of the art weaponry out there, i believe your bill does not call for any compensation of weapons already out there. other tha
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)